Yearly Archives: 2019

Pribhat theater group performing a play on the role of rural women in climate resilience.

Community World Service Asia, in collaboration with the Social Welfare Department and District Engagement Group[1] (DEG) Umerkot, celebrated the International Day of Rural Women 2019 to pay tribute to the rural women who are playing a vital role in the development of their communities. More than three hundred people attended the event.  Participants of the celebratory event included representatives from the district administration, police force, local government, the Population Welfare Department, Women Development Department, civil society organizations, teachers, artisans and the rural women of the district.

At the event, rural women were awarded appreciation shields for their proactive role in promoting socio-economic and cultural development in their communities. A local theater group, named Pirbhat, performed a play that conveyed messages on the role of rural women in societal development and climate change awareness as part of one of the event. The play was emotional in nature and gave a strong message. As part of the event format, participating human rights defenders, specialists and relevant government representatives gave inspirational speeches and acknowledged the contribution of women in socio-economic development, food security and rural development. Stall was set which displayed handcrafted apparel and home accessories produced by rural artisans.

Contributions and Challenges of Rural Women

The crucial role that women and girls play in ensuring the sustainability of rural households and communities and their overall contribution towards improving rural livelihoods and community wellbeing has lately been increasingly recognized. Women account for a substantial proportion of the agricultural labor force, including informal work, and perform the bulk of unpaid care and domestic work within families and households in rural areas. They make significant contributions to agricultural production, food security and nutrition, land and natural resource management, and building climate resilience.

Structural barriers and discriminatory social norms continue to constrain women’s decision-making power and political participation in rural households and communities. Women and girls in rural areas lack equal access to productive resources and assets, public services such as education and health care, and infrastructure, including water and sanitation, while much of their labor remains invisible and unpaid, even as their workloads become increasingly heavy due to the emigration of men. Globally, with few exceptions, every gender and development indicator for which data are available reveals that rural women fare worse than rural men and urban women and that they disproportionately experience poverty, exclusion and the effects of climate change.

The impacts of climate change, including on access to productive and natural resources, amplify existing gender inequalities in rural areas. Climate change affects women’s and men’s assets and well-being differently in terms of agricultural production, food security, health, water and energy resources, climate-induced migration and conflict, and climate-related natural disasters.

Comments from Speakers

Rashida Saand, renowned women’s rights worker from Umerkot, commented during her speech,

We believe that rural women have unique ideas and indigenous solutions to solve the current challenges facing a society that must be heard by the government and decision-makers. To benefit from the wisdom of women, community organizations must amplify the voices of rural women and call for women’s inclusion in the decision-making process at all levels.

Tarique Waheed Baloch from Women Development Department said that, on the occasion of the International Day of Rural Women,

They shall be encouraged to struggle for their just right of education, social welfare, and their legitimate rights. Village girls should be encouraged to get an education and step ahead in the field. Rural women face, among other problems, under-age marriages, and domestic violence, while they also share in work with men in agriculture and livestock farming besides sewing and embroidery. The government should ensure that technical training programs for rural women in the field of vocational training be started to provide them with opportunities to earn better incomes and live a better life along with educating their children.

Muhammad Bux Kumbhar, DEG member, said the observance day recognizes,

The critical role and contribution of rural women in enhancing agricultural and rural development, improving food security and eradicating rural poverty. As the world faces a critical need to act against climate change, this year’s theme highlights the important role that rural women and girls play in building resilience to face the climate crisis. Rural women represent the backbone of many communities, but they continue to face obstacles that prevent them from realizing their potential. The devastating impacts of climate change add to their hardship. Almost a third of women’s employment worldwide is in agriculture. Women cultivate land, collect food, water, and essential fuels, and sustain entire households, but lack equal access to land, finances, equipment, markets and decision-making power.

The guest of honor, Dr. Rubi Dharmdas from Umerkot, paid thanks and applauded Community World Service Asia, the Social Welfare Department Umerkot and District Engagement Groups for organizing such a great event to pay tribute to rural women. She added,

The contribution of the rural women is not being given due importance. Moreover, the right to basic facilities such as education and health are also overlooked. This is a great tradition initiated by Community World Service Asia to honor rural women by giving them due respect in terms of awards, as it will encourage many rural women to play a vital role in society.


[1] The District Engagement Group (DEG) comprises representatives from district-based CSOs, Steering Committees and Social Welfare Department responsible for networking and influencing relevant stakeholders and government departments on implementation of laws and policies related to women empowerment.

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Ali Sher Ranto, the son of a poor farmer, was eager to get an education and have a better life. Despite facing significant economic challenges during his schooling, he pressed on and completed his bachelor’s degree. Now, with new learnings and skills from the trainings organized by Community World Service Asia (CWSA), Ali Sher is helping to make life better for others in his village as well.

Ali Sher lives in the rural village of Ranta, located in Sindh’s Union Council Bijora. The village faces several social and economic challenges, including poor infrastructure, low literacy rate, lack of water, sanitation, and hygiene systems and practices, and limited livelihood opportunities. While a few individuals in Ranta are well educated, due to high unemployment rates and limited resources, many of them are jobless. Despite his degree, Ali Sher was one of them.

Since 2015, Ali Sher has been an active member of the Health Management Committeeⁱ in Ranta. He has been committed to bringing positive change in his village and area. He has actively participated in several events and trainings organized by Community World Service Asia including Community Management Skills, Disaster Risk Management, Leadership and Record Keeping, and Health and Hygiene. The learnings have helped Ali Sher to convey healthcare messages to others in his community as well.

“As a member of the health management committee and a representative of my village, it is my prime responsibility to think about and work to improve social issues within my village and area. I am determined to contribute to the development of my village, so I decided to teach the children on a voluntary basis to promote education in our area. This all happened with the knowledge and awareness that we obtained from meetings, trainings, seminars and workshops organized by Community World Service Asia and other organizations,” shared Ali Sher.

Today Ali Sher voluntarily teaches children at the primary school he himself once attended in his village. He has been doing this for three years now. He teaches classes one to five. In addition, he is supporting the school staff members in forming a school health and hygiene club in the same village. Through the club, he will impart the knowledge he has gained from the health and hygiene sessions he attended under the health project. As a result, Ali Sher’s students are more active, disciplined and healthy.


ⁱ Health Management Committee formed under the Health project to ensure community participation, ownership and support to communities in building awareness.

Health sessions were conducted where community members were provided with IEC material for better understanding to build a hygienic living environment.

Community World Service Asia (CWSA) provides basic health services with a focus on Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health Care (MNCH) under its Umerkot Health Project, supported by Act for Peace. The project is implemented in two Taluka Headquarter Hospitals (THQs) in district Umerkot, namely THQ Pithoro and THQ Samaro.

Free medical camps are set up, under the health project, to bring health care and health education to vulnerable populations who have no access to basic health care services or knowledge about diseases. The medical camps aim at providing free medical advice, medicine and referrals for specialized treatment if required. These camps make sure that people receive health care at the right time and see a doctor early enough before a small health problem turns serious.

The health team organized a free medical camp on September 24, 2019, in the village of Maryam Nagar, Taluka Pithoro, District Umerkot. This village is nine kilometers away from THQ Pithoro and lacks a regular transport facility in the area. Patients from more than four surrounding villages came to the camp for treatment; in total, 127 patients were treated, including 55 women and 7 men, 29 girls and 36 boys. Five antenatal care (ANC), three postnatal care (PNC), and six family planning patients were diagnosed and provided with medical services. The remaining 113 patients were treated through the outpatient department and provided with free medicine. Major diseases diagnosed and treated during the camp were anemia, scabies, musculoskeletal pain, diarrhea and ear and eye infections.

The Village Health Committee (comprised of both women and men) was involved in organizing the camp and facilitating the patients, while community mobilizers delivered health education sessions to women, men and children on food and nutrition as well as on the causes, symptoms and preventive measures for malaria and dengue fever. The community mobilizers also distributed Information, Education and Communication (IEC) material on related topics.

The Government Girls Primary School (GGPS) Abdul Wahid Colony in Umerkot, Pakistan, was struggling with low enrollment, low attendance and low engagement from the School Management Committee (SMC). In 2015, the school had a total of 80 students, with only 20 students newly enrolled. Sami, the school’s principal, identified several reasons.

Weak infrastructure and limited basic facilities discourage parents from sending their children to schools in Umerkot. Moreover, far off distances, social evils and child labor contribute to the high illiteracy rate as well. Teachers in schools often use old methodologies of teaching, such as reading the lessons, giving lectures and assigning lengthy homework. As a result, students do not have positive outcomes and lose interest in studies,

she said.

In 2016, Community World Service Asia invited teachers from the school to attend Teachers’ Trainings as part of the Girls’ Education Projectⁱ.  In 2017 and 2018, six teachers from GGPS Abdul Wahid Colony—Sakeena, Mariat, Mohni, Naheed, Tania and Sami—were trained on pedagogical skills, early childhood care and education (ECCE) teaching methodologies and implementation of the Scheme of Studiesⁱⁱ.

When Community World Service Asia came to us,

said Sami,

things started to change gradually.

Putting New Methods into Action

Sami was pleased with how practical and hands-on the trainings were, packed with new strategies they could implement right away. For example, they learned about new ways to engage with their students, such as involving them in morning meetings to increase social interactions and in practical work to build interest in learning. The training also placed strong emphasis on lesson planning, which has renewed the teachers’ excitement and dedication to their lessons.

Naheed attended a Teachers’ Training focused on ECCE Scheme of Studies and ECCE Methodologies in January 2019. Back in the classroom, she began implementing new teaching methodologies involving group work, pair activities and learning through play. Since then, Sami observed,

Students have become confident and regularly attend school, as they are enjoying their studies.

Sharing her learning experience, Naheed said,

We have developed a different attitude towards our students after the trainings. The child-friendly environment created in our classrooms has encouraged students to learn more freely and ask questions frequently without any hesitation. The quality of education has improved immensely as students are more engaged in active learning.

Naheed and the other teachers have also worked to increase teacher-parent interaction, with positive results among both students and their parents.

Parents are more involved in their children’s education updates and have witnessed the support the teachers give to their students in school. We have received positive feedback regarding teachers’ behavior with their children and the children’s increased interest in studies,

Sami added.

The students have noticed the difference. Humera, a student from class 4, shared,

There is so much change in our classroom. Our teacher, Naheed, encouraged us to participate in sports and cultural events and academic activities. We meet with students from different schools in these events and now I have made many friends in Umerkot. My parents motivate me to study hard after the parent-teacher meetings. They are very supportive and helpful, especially when I do my homework.

Reinvigorating the School Management Committee

The School Management Committee (SMC) of GGPS Abdul Wahid Colony is comprised of a General Secretary, a chairman, two teachers, two parents and two students. Its primary functions are to monitor teacher attendance, increase student enrollment and build awareness among parents on the importance of education for their children. It also holds administrative functions such as organizing co-curriculum activities, monitoring provision of free textbooks and disbursing SMC funds for improving the school. Unfortunately, the committee had not been fully engaged in its duties.

Abdul Razzaque, Senior MEAL Officer at Community World Service Asia, conducted a session for the SMC in February 2018, emphasizing the key role of the SMC in strengthening relationships between the schools and local communities. He highlighted each of the SMC’s functions and why it was important.

Shahida, who has served as the chairman of the SMC since 2017, said the difference was dramatic.

It was after the teachers’ training and SMC session that the SMC of Abdul Wahid Colony was actively involved in the school’s operations and academic decisions. The learnings provided by Community World Service Asia further built on our capacities to work towards better outcomes for our students, teachers and the entire school system,

 she said.

Sami is very pleased with the progress she has seen at the school since her team started to work with Community World Service Asia and implement what they learned through Teachers’ Trainings.

This year we have enrolled 60 new students, and today, a total of 210 students are studying in GGPS Abdul Wahid Colony. Moreover, 50% of the parents come to us for regular updates regarding their children’s progress after the Parent-Teacher meeting held in collaboration with Community World Service Asia,

she said.


ⁱ Improving Access and Quality of Education for Girls in Umerkot Project is implemented by Community World Service Asia with the support of Act for Peace.

ⁱⁱ A guideline for teachers that defines the structure and content of an academic course, its learning outcomes.

Hira Gul has worked in Pakistan’s development sector for more than 10 years. As a Community Mobilization Officer, Hira works with LASOONA to mobilize communities around improved livelihoods, governance reforms and health in Thana in the Malakand District. Her job is busy and multifaceted—she conducts sessions on developing market linkages, skill development, water and sanitation, inclusive development, improved governance, women’s empowerment and much more—and she is always eager to learn how to better support the communities she serves.

When Community World Service Asia announced the “Essentials of Social Mobilization” training, I immediately showed interest in attending the workshop as I was eager to learn modified and effective processes of social mobilization,

she shared.

Hira was one of 22 participants from five national nongovernment organizations who gathered in Peshawar in March 2019 to enhance their social mobilization skills to raise awareness of and demand for a particular development objective through dialogue. Lead Trainer Muazzam Ali, a seasoned expert in community mobilization with CWSA, facilitated the four-day training workshop on practical skills for successful social mobilization.

The training enhanced our understanding of social mobilization as an approach. We learnt the key elements and the true role of a social mobilizer. Basic communications skills, ethics and tools were provided for successful mobilization processes. Moreover, the training taught us how to manage community expectations and keep them engaged through the project life cycle, 

Hira recalled.

After the training, Hira said she was able to use the learning right away, including actively implementing the Do No Harm Policy while engaging communities in project activities.

In addition, through rapport building with women, I gave a session on the Do No Harm policy and mobilized them towards the outcomes of the project. This way the project participants are provided assistance with dignity and safety.

She also found the training useful in managing an ongoing conflict in communities she supported. Under LASOONA’s Governance Reform project, two communities in Union Council Miadam in Swat were engaged in a conflict in relation to Community Physical Infrastructure (CPI) Schemes. Thanks to Community World Service Asia, Hira managed to resolve the conflict through her learning she gathered from the session on Conflict Resolution.

Baseer Ahmad, resident of Village Kikri, Mipur Azad Kashmir. His father passed away in the earthquake.

Large areas of the District Mirpur, Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK), were jolted on Tuesday, September 24, 2019, by a 5.8 magnitude earthquake with a depth of only 10 km. The area experienced frequent aftershocks; the strongest, with a magnitude of 4.8, occurred on Thursday, September 26 and injured an additional 70 people. Two districts, Mirpur and Bimber, which are home to an estimated 876,824 people, suffered large scale damages. Recent information from the Office of the Commissioner stated that 10,500 families in Mirpur and Bimber alone have been affected by the earthquake; this information has been verified by the Natural Disaster Consortium’s initial assessment.[1]

As per the NDC’s report, 37 people in Mirpur lost their lives, and 579 people, including children and women, were injured. Heavy jolts damaged shelters and infrastructure as well as badly affected livelihoods. The NDC stated that a total of 9,000 houses have been affected; of these, 2,000 are fully destroyed and 6,000 are partially damaged. The houses with partial damage have major structural damage, requiring more than minor repair. Additionally, 50 acres of land has become uncultivable. Boreholes, which are the main drinking water sources in the affected areas, have been disturbed and contaminated; since the earthquake, turbidity has been reported in the drinking water. Health issues among the affected population have included had vomiting after drinking water from the same sources. Household and non-food items in the target area have also been destroyed, people are in need of food and many are living under open sky or with family. Their situation has worsened with the recent monsoon rains, which will continue into October 2019.

The infrastructure in Kashmir is very weak in context of the strong earthquakes it faces. The villages and small towns of the hardest-hit districts are amongst the poorest; the majority of the population relies on agriculture, daily wages or are caretakers of houses and have very low salaries. The Government has initiated the damage assessment of the area, but due to resource limitation, it has mainly prioritized and focused on infrastructure damages. The Government has been very forthcoming in providing assistance but again owing to resource limitation and level of damages it is not managed to cover all sectors.

Community World Service Asia, with support from the Start Network and the Act Alliance Rapid Response Fund, is supporting affected communities with water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) support. In the short term, communities in the affected areas are also in critical need of shelter/winterized tents, food, non-food items, safe drinking water, health interventions and psychosocial support. In the long term, recovery and rehabilitation support will be required for rehabilitation of their shelters, revitalization of their livelihoods, school rehabilitation and WASH support.

“It is difficult for me to go through this situation as I never thought I would be one day sitting under a tent, in need for assistance. This experience of the earthquake thought me an important lesson that there are kind people everywhere in this world. Humanitarian workers from different NGOs came to provide assistance.”

Shazia, resident of Kikri Village, Mirpur District

“It was around 4:00 P.M. when the earthquake occurred. I was in my shop when I received a call that my house has collapsed and my family was in the house. I fainted at the sight of my collapsed house. I came to know my family was safe after two hours of unconsciousness.”

Rukhsaar, Kikri Village, Mirpur

[1] The Natural Disaster Consortium (NDC) is a consortium funded by DFID; its members include national, international and UN agencies.

Rationale

The impact of humanitarian work on communities depends greatly upon the quality of services and accountability of actions both during emergency and non-emergency times. However, the impact of our activities depends as much on behavioural and professional standards of individuals who work for our organisations. Humanitarian agencies therefore have a duty of care to affected communities and a responsibility to ensure that right-holders are treated with dignity and respect and that certain minimum standards of behaviour are observed. The goal is to create an environment free of sexual exploitation and abuse, harassment and other unacceptable behaviour in humanitarian crisis and development work.

Course Aim and Objectives

The objective of this course is to gather professional humanitarian workers from (I)NGOs, UN, donors and government agencies who aim to become experts in complaints handling. It will allow participants to understand the linkages between quality & accountability and handling complaints, from reception to investigation and implementation of the learning. More specifically, at the end of the course, participants will have acquired the following skills:

  • Understand the different Q&A initiatives and how they complete each other
  • Explain and apply the 9 Core Humanitarian Standard (CHS) commitments and identify how they contribute to improved humanitarian interventions
  • Explain terminology related to sensitive complaints
  • Understand the global investigative framework including specific skills to conduct interviews
  • Demonstrate a robust knowledge on how to handle complaints, from communication to reception of complaints and subsequent investigations
  • Able to support and manage an ongoing investigation and its follow-up action

Methodology

The methodology will be very participatory, allowing participants to be involved in a dynamic way at all times through presentations, debates, experience sharing, group work, learning parts, videos. The course will be conducted in English.

Who Should Apply

This workshop has been designed for those staff members working to establish and handle complaints system in their organizations or staff members involved in the Prevention of

Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA) as well as investigating sensitive complaints. Applicants fulfilling the following criteria are eligible to participate:

  • Senior and mid-level managers, including project coordinators involved in complaints handling and Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA)
  • Proficiency in English

How to apply

Kindly fill out the Online Application Form: https://forms.gle/trS5Rf5A1zCtRhqM8 or fill the attached form and send it to qa.support@communityworldservice.asia by October 20, 2019. Applicants will be notified/confirmed about their participation by October 31, 2019. For further information or queries please feel free to contact us: qa.support@communityworldservice.asia

Please make sure you include contact information (postal address, e-mail or phone number) you will access during those dates, at the latest. Space will be allocated on a ‘first-confirmed, first-served’ basis. Payment of the tuition fee will confirm the course registration.

Things you need to know!

When: November 29 – December 2, 2019
Where: Bangkok, Thailand
Registration Fee: US$ 650 (All-inclusive except for dinners and travel cost to & from Bangkok).
Application deadline: October 20, 2019

Please note

  • Participants are expected to arrive in Bangkok on November 28 and depart on December 3 and will be accommodated for maximum 5 nights (on double occupancy basis).
  • All participants are expected to attend the collaborative event on the morning of 29th of November.
  • Two meals (breakfast and lunch), in addition to refreshments will be provided during the training. Participants will be responsible for their own dinner.
  • Participants are advised to please confirm any expense related information from Community World Service Asia to ensure all financial matters are clarified.

Meet the Trainer

Ms. Ester Dross is an independent consultant with over 25 years of experience, specializing in accountability, prevention of sexual exploitation and abuse, gender and child protection.

Ester had extensive exposure to humanitarian certification systems and accountability to affected populations while working with HAP International as their Complaints Handling and Investigation Advisor, later as their Certification Manager. She has been closely involved in the Building Safer Organizations Project since 2005, dealing with sexual exploitation and abuse of beneficiaries, particularly focusing on gender and child protection. Over the last 6 years and since working as an independent consultant, Ester has been leading a pilot project for FAO on accountability and gender mainstreaming in emergencies and working with numerous NGOs including ACT Alliance members, supporting and training their staff on gender issues, child protection, accountability, complaints handling and investigations. She is an experienced investigator herself and has conducted investigations in Asia, South America, Africa and Europe.

There’s More

The CHS Exchange

When: 08.30 AM Tuesday, November 19 to 12.00 PM Wednesday, November 20
Where: Pullman Bangkok King Power Hotel 8/2 Rangnam Road, Thanon-Phayathai, Ratchathewi, 10400 Bangkok

Organized by the CHS Alliance, the CHS Exchange provides the opportunity to debate and discuss how the CHS can make aid work better for people in crisis. For more detail and registration please visit https://www.chsalliance.org/events/bangkok-chs-exchange/

The CHS Alliance General Assembly (Members only)

When: Wednesday afternoon, November 20 to Thursday, November 21
Where: Pullman Bangkok King Power Hotel 8/2 Rangnam Road, Thanon-Phayathai, Ratchathewi, 10400 Bangkok

The physical General Assembly of CHS Alliance members is an important opportunity for the membership to agree on the collective way forward, in our commitment to the CHS and making aid work better for people. For more details and registration, please visit https://www.chsalliance.org/get-support/event/bangkok-chs-exchange-and-general-assembly/

OCHA/ICVA/ADRRN Events

When: Tuesday, November 26 to Friday, November 29
Where: Bangkok, Thailand (Venue to be decided)

United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), The International Council of Voluntary Agencies (ICVA) and Asian Disaster Reduction and Response Network (ADRRN) are holding a range of events, including thematic sessions, in a collaborative manner during the four days. For more details, please be in touch with the organizers.

Launch and Panel Discussion

When: 09.00 AM to 12.00 PM Friday, November 29
Where: Windsor Suites Hotel 10/1 Sukhumvit Soi 20, Sukhumvit Road, Bangkok, Thailand.

A collaborative event will be organized by Community World Service Asia, OCHA, ICVA, ADRRN, Act Church of Sweden, CHS Alliance and Sphere. It will include the launch of the updated booklet on Quality and Accountability for Project Cycle Management. This user-friendly booklet is designed especially for field practitioners working in the humanitarian and development sector to improve quality and accountability of their projects towards communities. The revised version aims to introduce advance tools to use at each stage of the project cycle, allowing enhanced practical implementation of quality and accountability. The launch will be followed by a stimulating panel discussion by panelists representing a range of experiences on accountability towards affected populations. More information will be circulated soon.

Advancing women leadership

When: November 24 to 29, 2019
Where: Windsor Suites Hotel 10/1 Sukhumvit Soi 20, Sukhumvit Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Community World Service Asia is organizing a training on Advancing Women Leadership. This training is a holistic approach to leveraging the strength and power of women. We are all unique beings and this course lends itself to that. For more details and registration, please visit: http://bit.do/a-w-l-2019

Training of Trainers on Quality & Accountability to Affected Populations

When: November 23 to 29, 2019
Where: Windsor Suites Hotel 10/1 Sukhumvit Soi 20, Sukhumvit Road, Bangkok, Thailand

As part of Community World Service Asia’s response to the demands for more support on awareness raising, capacity building and collective learning, we are delighted to announce the upcoming Training of Trainers on Quality & Accountability to Affected Populations. This event is a unique opportunity for all agencies, to equip staff to both disseminate and implement the standards. For more details and registration, please visit: http://bit.do/fbbcU

Cancellation/Postponement

CWSA reserves the right to cancel or postpone the course if circumstances require. Registered participants will be informed with 100% fee refund. However, if the participant wishes to cancel the registration, he/she requires informing CWSA office at least one month in advance or else the fee will not be refunded.

About Community World Service Asia

Community World Service Asia is a humanitarian and development organization, Registered in Pakistan, head-quartered in Karachi and implementing initiatives throughout Asia. We aim to address factors that divide people by promoting inclusiveness, shared values, diversity, and interdependence. Marginalized communities are assisted Irrespective of race, faith, color, age, sex, economic status, or political opinion. Respecting the right to choose how to live, we work with marginalized communities to overcome the impacts of inequalities and lead peaceful, dignified and resilient lives.

Our focus areas include: Emergencies; Climate Action and Resilience Building; Education; Health; Livelihoods; Water, Sanitation & Hygiene; and, Humanitarian Quality and Accountability. We engage in the self-implementation of projects, cooperation through partners, and the provision of capacity building trainings and resources at the national, regional and global levels.

To strengthen and extend the reach of our commitments to promoting quality and accountability in humanitarian response, we are a member of the Core Humanitarian Standard (CHS) Alliance and Sphere. We are the Sphere Country Focal Point in Pakistan and the Regional Partner in Asia for the Sphere. Community World Service Asia is ISO 9001:2015 certified and has also received the USAID management standards certification. We have also been certified as a Gender Friendly Organization (GFO) in Pakistan and have undergone the CHS self-assessment. Our commitment and capacities enable us to collaborate with key partners on advocating, building capacity, and enhancing quality and accountability of humanitarian action both within Pakistan and the wider region.

Disclaimer

Community World Service Asia shall not be made liable for any damage, loss, illness, injuries or death that may occur to or be caused by the participants during the course of training or travel to and from the training venue.

Download

Click here download brochure and invitation letter.

For further details, please contact:

Mr. Khurram Saeed
Email: qa.support@communityworldservice.asia
Contact: +92 51 2307484
Web: www.communityworldservice.asia

Rationale

The impact of humanitarian work on communities depends greatly upon the quality of services and accountability of actions both during times of emergency and non-emergency. With millions of people affected by disasters and conflicts, the importance of Quality & Accountability to Affected Populations is undeniable.

Therefore, enhancing collective Quality and Accountability is not an option for humanitarian actors and organisations. However, while implementation happens, both staff and organisations recognize that they face many challenges, and proper use of the existing relevant tools is still at stake.

As part of Community World Service Asia’s response to the demands for more support on awareness raising, capacity building and collective learning, we are delighted to announce the upcoming Training of Trainers on Quality & Accountability to Affected Populations. This event is a unique opportunity for all agencies, to equip staff to both disseminate and implement the standards.

Methodology

The methodology will be very participatory, allowing participants to be involved in a dynamic way at all times through presentations, debates, experience sharing, group work, learning pairs, writing sessions, design of proposals and recommendations, etc. The course will be conducted in English.

Who is this training for?

  • (I)NGOs, UN agencies, Governmental actors, donors, universities, private sector, etc.
  • Both humanitarian and development actors

Participants:

  • Have attended previously a training or a ToT on a related topic
  • Are leaders in promoting Quality, AAP and PSEA
  • Have experience in: a) implementing Quality, AAP and PSEA approaches and tools, or b) managing projects or programmes, or c) training, facilitating and adult learning
  • Have a ‘good enough’ command of English

ToT Aim:

This ToT aims to gather committed professional humanitarian and development actors from around the world who are leaders in promoting and implementing Quality, AAP and PSEA throughout the Humanitarian Programme Cycle (HPC)/ Project Cycle Management (PCM), update them on the latest developments and tools, and equip them for further implementation and dissemination.

By the end of the ToT, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify key initiatives contributing to Quality, AAP and PSEA and their updated tools such as the Core Humanitarian Standard (CHS), Sphere and the Humanitarian Standards Partnership (HSP), etc.
  2. Outline the opportunities and challenges faced by humanitarian and development workers in contextualising and applying collectively principles, commitments and standards throughout the HPC/ PCM
  3. Describe and use adult learning principles, techniques and tools
  4. Design an action plan on Quality, AAP and PSEA tailored to their context
  5. Identify strategies and means by which they and their colleagues can collaborate and coordinate with other agencies.

Things you need to know!

Where: Windsor Suites Hotel Bangkok, Thailand

When: November 23-29, 2019

Fees: NGO US $1200/- INGO US $1400/- UN US $1600/- (All-inclusive except dinners and travel cost to & from Bangkok)

Language: English

Please note

  • Participants are expected to arrive in Bangkok on November 22 and depart on November 29, evening and will be accommodated for maximum of 8 days (7 nights).
  • All participants are expected to attend the collaborative event on the 29th of November, as it is linked to issues that will be covered during the TOT.
  • Two meals (breakfast and lunch), in addition to refreshments, will be provided during the training. Participants will be responsible for their own dinner.
  • Participants are advised to please confirm any expense related information from Community World Service Asia to ensure all financial matters are clarified.

How to apply:

Kindly click on the following link or QR code for registration: http://bit.do/fbbcU Or fill-in the attached application and send it along with your resume to shaprograms@communityworldservice.asia by October 30, 2019.

Applicants will be notified if their participation is confirmed as application forms are received. Please make sure you include contact information (postal address, e-mail or phone number) you will access during those dates, at the latest. Space will be allocated on a ‘first-confirmed, first-served’ basis. Payment of the tuition fee will confirm the course registration.

There’s MORE!

THE CHS EXCHANGE

When: 08.30 AM Tuesday, November 19 to 12.00 PM Wednesday, November 20

Where: Pullman Bangkok King Power Hotel 8/2 Rangnam Road, Thanon-Phayathai, Ratchathewi, 10400 Bangkok.

Organized by the CHS Alliance, the CHS Exchange provides the opportunity to debate and discuss how the CHS can make aid work better for people in crisis. For more detail and registration please visit https://www.chsalliance.org/events/bangkok-chs-exchange/

The CHS Alliance General Assembly (Members only)

When: Wednesday afternoon, November 20 to Thursday, November 21

Where: Pullman Bangkok King Power Hotel 8/2 Rangnam Road, Thanon-Phayathai, Ratchathewi, 10400 Bangkok

The physical General Assembly of CHS Alliance members is an important opportunity for the membership to agree on the collective way forward, in our commitment to the CHS and making aid work better for people. For more details and registration, please visit https://www.chsalliance.org/get-support/event/bangkok-chs-exchange-and-general-assembly/

OCHA/ICVA/ADRRN Events

When: Tuesday, November 26 to Friday, November 29

Where: Bangkok, Thailand (Venue to be decided)

United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), The International Council of Voluntary Agencies (ICVA) and Asian Disaster Reduction and Response Network (ADRRN) are holding a range of events, including thematic sessions, in a collaborative manner during the four days. For more details, please be in touch with the organizers.

LAUNCH AND PANEL DISCUSSION

When: 09.00 AM to 12.00 PM Friday, November 29

Where: Windsor Suites Hotel 10/1 Sukhumvit Soi 20, Sukhumvit Road, Bangkok, Thailand.

A collaborative event will be organized by Community World Service Asia, OCHA, ICVA , ADRRN, Act Church of Sweden, CHS Alliance and Sphere. It will include the launch of the updated booklet on Quality and Accountability for Project Cycle Management. This user-friendly booklet is designed especially for field practitioners working in the humanitarian and development sector to improve quality and accountability of their projects towards communities. The revised version aims to introduce advance tools to use at each stage of the project cycle, allowing enhanced practical implementation of quality and accountability. The launch will be followed by a stimulating panel discussion by panelists representing a range of experiences on accountability towards affected populations. More information will be circulated soon.

ADVANCING WOMEN LEADERSHIP

When: November 24 to 29, 2019

Where: Windsor Suites Hotel 10/1 Sukhumvit Soi 20, Sukhumvit Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Community World Service Asia is organizing a training on Advancing Women Leadership. This training is a holistic approach to leveraging the strength and power of women. We are all unique beings and this course lends itself to that. For more details and registration, please visit: http://bit.do/a-w-l-2019

MANAGING COMPLAINTS RESPONSE MECHANISM (CRM)

When: November 29 – December 2, 2019

Where: Windsor Suites Hotel 10/1 Sukhumvit Soi 20, Sukhumvit Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Organized by Community World Service Asia and ACT Church of Sweden, this course aims to gather professional humanitarian and development workers from (I)NGOs, UN, donors and government agencies to become experts in complaints handling. It will allow participants to understand the linkages between quality & accountability and handling complaints. For more details and registration, please visit: http://bit.do/c-r-m-2019

Click here to download the brochure

WOMEN AND LEADERSHIP = GREATNESS

Reflection and empowerment through effective communication, action, and beyond…

DESCRIPTION

As women we are preoccupied with everything around us that we often neglect, to our own detriment, ourselves. While women are “looking after” and “dealing with” matters, no one is reflective of their limitations and needs both personally and professionally. A change needs to happen at all levels in order to give everyone the space and opportunity to grow, flourish, and re-invent ourselves as part of this complex and dynamic world.

OBJECTIVE

The world greatly needs the strength and leadership qualities of women. This transformation is about being provocative, working and treating each other as allies, and being agents of change.

This training is a holistic approach to leveraging the power of women. We are all unique beings and this course lends itself to that. It is an opportunity to facilitate, lead, take control, and think outside the box about real problems that impact women. It is bringing about real change, one conversation at a time. As your facilitator, I invite you to take on this challenge to be the best leader you can be through every stage of your life.

OPPORTUNITY

The answer to the problem is not about reflecting on the past or pre-empting the future, it is about the moment and the very best we do in order to change things right here, right now moving forward.

METHODOLOGY

The methodology will be very participatory, allowing participants to be involved in a dynamic way at all times through presentations, debates, experience sharing, group work, learning pairs, writing workshops, design of programs and activities, etc. The course will be conducted in English.

THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW!

When: 24th – 29th November 2019

Where: Windsor Suites Hotel Bangkok, Thailand

Fees: USD 800

Language: English

  • Participants are expected to arrive in Bangkok on November 23 and depart on November 29, evening and will be accommodated for maximum 7 days (6 nights)
  • All participants are invited to attend the half-day event on the 29th of November. More details to follow.
  • Two meals (breakfast and lunch), in addition to refreshments will be provided during the training. Participants will be responsible for their own dinner.
  • Participants are advised to please confirm any expense related information from Community World Service Asia to ensure all financial matters are clarified.

HOW TO APPLY?

Kindly click on the following link for registration: https://forms.gle/bkBHB3zUxXHo3cWZ9 Or fill out the attached application form and send it to Zunaira Shams along with your resume to (zunaira.shams@communityworldservice.asia) by October 30, 2019.

Applicants will be notified if their participation is confirmed as application forms are received. Please make sure you include contact information (postal address, e-mail or phone number) you will access during those dates. Payment of the tuition fee will confirm the course registration.

WHAT’S THE TRAINING ALL ABOUT?

Training Objectives:

  • To learn the fundamentals of leadership, communication, and change/transformation;
  • To analyze personal, professional, and social relationships;
  • To better understand emotional intelligence and how it works;
  • To share, discuss, and analyze experiences that will advance talents and skills Who can attend?
  • Participants will need to have at least three years of employment experience in the humanitarian or development sector;
  • Requirement to attend all five days of the course and the half-day event on the 29th of November;
  • Be willing to complete and/or share elements of a self-assessment/evaluation

Program Details:

  • DAY 1 – The Modern Leader
  • DAY 2 – Make Your Impression
  • DAY 3 – Networking
  • DAY 4 – Taking Care of Yourself
  • DAY 5 – Putting Your Best Foot Forward

Time:

5 days

THERE’S MORE:

THE CHS EXCHANGE

When: 08.30 AM Tuesday, November 19 to 12.00 PM Wednesday, November 20

Where: Pullman Bangkok King Power Hotel 8/2 Rangnam Road, Thanon-Phayathai, Ratchathewi, 10400 Bangkok

Organized by the CHS Alliance, the CHS Exchange provides the opportunity to debate and discuss how the CHS can make aid work better for people in crisis. For more detail and registration please visit: https://www.chsalliance.org/events/bangkok-chs-exchange/

The CHS Alliance General Assembly (Members only)

When: Wednesday afternoon, November 20 to Thursday, November 21

Where: Pullman Bangkok King Power Hotel 8/2 Rangnam Road, Thanon-Phayathai, Ratchathewi, 10400 Bangkok

The physical General Assembly of CHS Alliance members is an important opportunity for the membership to agree on the collective way forward, in our commitment to the CHS and making aid work better for people.

For more details and registration, please visit: https://www.chsalliance.org/get-support/event/bangkok-chs-exchange-and-general-assembly/

OCHA/ICVA/ADRRN Events

When: Tuesday, November 26 to Friday, November 29

Where: Bangkok, Thailand (Venue to be decided)

United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), The International Council of Voluntary Agencies (ICVA) and Asian Disaster Reduction and Response Network (ADRRN) are holding a range of events, including thematic sessions, in a collaborative manner during the four days. For more details, please be in touch with the organizers.

LAUNCH AND PANEL DISCUSSION

When: 09.00 AM to 12.00 PM Friday, November 29

Where: Windsor Suites Hotel 10/1 Sukhumvit Soi 20, Sukhumvit Road, Bangkok, Thailand.

A collaborative event will be organized by Community World Service Asia, OCHA, ICVA, ADRRN, Act Church of Sweden, CHS Alliance and Sphere. It will include the launch of the updated booklet on Quality and Accountability for Project Cycle Management. This user-friendly booklet is designed especially for field practitioners working in the humanitarian and development sector to improve quality and accountability of their projects towards communities. The revised version aims to introduce advance tools to use at each stage of the project cycle, allowing enhanced practical implementation of quality and accountability. The launch will be followed by a stimulating panel discussion by panelists representing a range of experiences on accountability towards affected populations.

WHO IS THE TRAINER?

Connie Cheung brings a different kind of energy and approach to workshops in an effort to bring out the authentic leader in everyone. Each participant will have the opportunity to reflect, listen, and lead as a unique individual. Connie’s goal is to facilitate a training that will enable participants to: checking-in, build and/or recalibrate the foundation from where they will continue on their journey wherever they are in life.

Connie’s career is grounded in emergency management. Through the years she has complemented her career by actively coaching, mentoring, and addressing issues related to workplace wellness, which include mental health and well-being. Her aspirations are to encourage people to embrace change and reinvent themselves.

Click here to download the brochure and invitation letter.