Tags Posts tagged with "Capacity Building"

Capacity Building

DurationApr 01, 2015Mar 31, 2018
LocationDistrict Umerkot, Thatta, Sindh Province
Key Activities
  • Developing women’s skills in embroidery, dying, block printing and quilting through vocational training;
  • Formation of Women’s Enterprise Groups;
  • Training of women with basic literacy and numeracy skills as Sales and Marketing Agents;
  • Training of skilled women as Quality Assurance Supervisors;
  • Gender awareness activities to sensitize communities on gender discrimination and encourage support of women’s income-generation, control over resources and household decision-making;
  • Formation of Household Gender Action Groups
Participants700 women in vocational training
3,080 immediate and 7,560 extended household members benefitting from increased income
1,400 men and community members benefitting directly from gender sensitization activities
3,450 community members sensitized on gender issues through Gender Action Groups

DurationJun 01, 2014Nov 30, 2014
LocationKohat, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, Pakistan
Key Activities
  • Provision of vaccinated, improved breed poultry, a cage and one month’s feed to 175 participants
  • Vocational skills development training on tailoring and embroidery, and provision of start-up kits, for 50 women
  • Training on driving, welding, plumbing, auto-mechanics, tailoring and electrical repair for 50 men
Participants50 men and 225 women heads of households representing 275 families or 1,790 individuals

PhasePhase OnePhase Two
DurationSep 07, 2014Sep 06, 2015
LocationMansehra and Haripur Districts (Afghan Refugees Camps and surrounding host community)
Key Activities
  • Provide vocational skills to 216 Afghan refugees (144 men and 72 women) and 144 Pakistanis (96 men and 48 women) from the host community to earn dignified livelihood through vocational training.
  • Trades included in the vocational training program are: tailoring, motorcycle repairing, electrical work, and welding for men and dress designing/tailoring and handicraft for women.
  • Secure employment for and increase household income of 513 previously-trained and 360 newly trained graduates.
Participants360 (240 male and 120 Female) Training participants
270 Previous male graduates: Marketing/linkages:
370 (100 women and 270 men): Refresher/advance training:
216 (100 women & 116 men): Employment/linkages of newly trained graduates
240 Women: Enterprise development training
20 (10 men and 10 women): Small medium enterprises
100 Graduates (men): Linkages/employment in Afghanistan
30 Graduates (women): Exhibition

PhasePhase OnePhase Two
DurationJul 01, 2010
LocationMansehra and Haripur, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, Pakistan
Key Activities
  • Skills training in auto mechanics, carpentry, electrical works, masonry, plumbing, welding, dress designing and handicrafts
  • Training on market behavior
  • Career counselling
  • Curriculum vitae (CV) writing skills
Participants1,005 male Afghan refugees and members of host communities
510 female Afghan refugees and members of host communities

I now play an important role in my family’s livelihood. We spend most of this money on nutritional needs and also health and clothing needs…I will invest some of the net profit in order to make my business more stable and productive.

Majid Khan, vocational training participant who opened his own business

DurationJul 01, 2013Jun 30, 2014
LocationMansehra, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province
Key Activities
  • Consultations by qualified doctors and lady health visitors (LHV)
  • Provision of essential drugs
  • Reproductive Health care services with a special focus on Mother and Child health including Ante-Natal and Post-Natal care
  • Health Education sessions focusing on water borne diseases, STIs, HIV/AIDs, locally relevant diseases and distribution of information materials
  • Referral of patients to Secondary and Tertiary healthcare facilities
  • Management of alerts, threats and outbreaks, if any, in collaboration with MOH/WHO
  • DEWS reporting
  • Expanded program on immunization against childhood preventable diseases
Participants60,000 Afghan refugees

When I was a child, I received vaccinations from CWS-P/A’s basic health unit and visited the BHU when I was sick. It was my dream to become a doctor and help my community. I really liked the vaccination and awareness programs, which is why I wanted to work and am still here eleven years later as a medical officer.

Dr. Wali Jan, a doctor with Community World Service Asia’s health program

2035
DurationAug 01, 2012
LocationThatta District, Sindh Province, Pakistan
Key Activities
  • Formation of local health management committees to raise awareness of the health center and its services, and promote knowledge of key health issues;
  • Provision of check-ups for women and children, symptomatic diagnostics, pregnancy tests, ante- and post- natal care, family planning, provision of free medicines and nutritional supplements, and referral of cases;
  • Curative services to children under five, pregnant and lactating mothers
  • Community health sessions on family planning, ante- and post- natal care, hygiene and sanitation, nutrition, breastfeeding, and common and seasonal diseases
Participants20,504 community members (population of Union Council Bijora, District Thatta)

I am very happy with the support of CWS-P/A; they have saved my baby…They have properly guided me for nutrition and care of my pregnancy.

Noor Jahan, MNCH patient

If this center would not have existed, I couldn’t have accessed treatment from any hospital due to my poor economical situation. No doubt CWS-P/A has saved my life.

Muhammad Mallah, MNCH patient

PhasePhase OnePhase Three
DurationJan 01, 2015Dec 31, 2015
LocationThatta, Sindh Province, Pakistan
Key Activities
  • Adult literacy and vocational training
  • Product development and market linkages
  • Training workshops on disaster risk reduction skills, techniques and procedures
  • Community awareness-raising on key issues of sexual and reproductive health
  • Training and mobilization of community activists
Participants4,700 women from rural communities

After getting admission in the adult literacy center, I used to teach my daughters. My daughters were inspired when they saw me go to school with my bag. Now, they are motivated for education, and I have admitted them into the local school.

Saima, a project participant

After the 2010 floods, I have worked with different NGOs/INGOs. The way CWS-P/A works for sustainability is genius. We like working with them. Other organizations have given shelter, etc, but then they leave. These vocational skills will never die and will trickle down to our children.

Samoon, President of the Village Organization in Ghulam Mohammad Soorjo

We were very glad to see that our embroidery work can be sold in the market. I saw a hand bag for Rs. 300 (USD 3). I didn’t know these small handbags could be expensive. After the first visit, I came back and shared about the differences in cost here and in Karachi.

Bejum Jan, participant in the exposure visit to Karachi

PhasePhase OnePhase Three
DurationJan 01, 2015Dec 31, 2017
LocationThatta, Sindh Province, Pakistan
Key Activities
  • Women empowerment through adult learning center, vocational training center, and product development/market linkages
  • Sexual reporductive health (SRH) and GBC awareness through theater groups
  • DRR awareness to community and schools
Participants2,300community members

After getting admission in the adult literacy center, I used to teach my daughters. My daughters were inspired when they saw me go to school with my bag. Now, they are motivated for education, and I have admitted them into the local school.

Saima, a project participant

After the 2010 floods, I have worked with different NGOs/INGOs. The way CWS-P/A works for sustainability is genius. We like working with them. Other organizations have given shelter, etc, but then they leave. These vocational skills will never die and will trickle down to our children.

Samoon, President of the Village Organization in Ghulam Mohammad Soorjo

We were very glad to see that our embroidery work can be sold in the market. I saw a hand bag for Rs. 300 (USD 3). I didn’t know these small handbags could be expensive. After the first visit, I came back and shared about the differences in cost here and in Karachi.

Bejum Jan, participant in the exposure visit to Karachi

PhasePhase OnePhase Three
DurationSep 01, 2012Aug 01, 2013
LocationThatta, Sindh Province, Pakistan
Key Activities
  • Adult literacy and vocational training
  • Product development and market linkages
  • Training workshops on disaster risk reduction skills, techniques and procedures
  • Community awareness-raising on key issues of sexual and reproductive health
  • Training and mobilization of community activists
Participants4,700 women from rural communities

After getting admission in the adult literacy center, I used to teach my daughters. My daughters were inspired when they saw me go to school with my bag. Now, they are motivated for education, and I have admitted them into the local school.

Saima, a project participant

After the 2010 floods, I have worked with different NGOs/INGOs. The way CWS-P/A works for sustainability is genius. We like working with them. Other organizations have given shelter, etc, but then they leave. These vocational skills will never die and will trickle down to our children.

Samoon, President of the Village Organization in Ghulam Mohammad Soorjo

We were very glad to see that our embroidery work can be sold in the market. I saw a hand bag for Rs. 300 (USD 3). I didn’t know these small handbags could be expensive. After the first visit, I came back and shared about the differences in cost here and in Karachi.

Bejum Jan, participant in the exposure visit to Karachi

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Developing a strong network, where each organization can learn and apply the Sphere standards to improve their humanitarian accountability is one of Mr. Kep Kannaro’s goals. Kannaro, the new Sphere Focal Point for Cambodia, is also the Cambodian Humanitarian Forum’s (CHF)[1] Chairperson and Executive Director of Partnership for Development in Kampuchea (PADEK).

In 2011, Kannaro participated in CWS-P/A Sphere training for the first time. Shortly afterward, Cambodia experienced massive floods. He immediately initiated an emergency response proposal, integrating the Sphere standards. “It was very difficult to put into practice,” admitted Kannaro. “We’ve been blamed for not responding as quickly as we should because of time taken by the assessments. However, the results were positive and the donors were really satisfied.”

Convinced about the potential of the Sphere standards and the importance to enhance quality and accountability of humanitarian response in Cambodia, Kannaro wanted to enhance the expertise of the Cambodian civil society organizations.

In 2012, with the support of USAID Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) and Asian Disaster Preparedness Center (ADPC), Kannaro created the Cambodian Humanitarian Forum, a network of national organizations dedicated to strengthening emergency response capacities of national organizations. Since its creation, CHF has organized several capacity building initiatives, including Sphere standards trainings, and established an information and resource-sharing center.

CWS-P/A approached CHF this year based on a consultative process with some Cambodian organizations about the possibility of having a Sphere Country Focal Point in Cambodia. CHF accepted this role. As Chairperson of CHF, Kannaro took it as an opportunity to learn from his peers in the region and to transfer the acquired knowledge to his Cambodian counterparts.

“Awareness has increased and standards are more integrated in their emergency response after the training given by the forum.”

Today, Kannaro is proud of the progress made by Cambodian non-profits who benefited from the trainings. “Awareness has increased and standards are more integrated into their emergency response after the training given by the forum [CHF].” He also emphasized the challenges ahead. Despite the progress, he admitted, “Not many organizations are aware about the Sphere standards, and we also need to work closely with the government to mainstream those standards into the humanitarian response.”

Kannaro is enthusiastic about how the Sphere standards positively impact humanitarian response. His goal is to advocate for a proper disaster response law that would integrate the minimum standards. “If we can integrate standards in the law, more NGOs will apply them.” With a smile and positive outlook, Kannaro concluded, “It will be difficult, but we can make it.”

Kannaro and CHF exemplify of how capacity building and an effective networking platform can strengthen the promotion and application of the Sphere standards in humanitarian programs. They also demonstrate the importance of having Sphere champions, the ones who can inspire, empower, and engage more organizations for improving humanitarian effectiveness and enhancing the quality of aid delivery to the communities.

In October 2014, Kannaro was among ten Sphere country focal points who participated in the Sphere Focal Point Forum in Bangkok, Thailand. The event encouraged candid discussion, peer learning, and joint advocacy while enabling a sense of community among Sphere practitioners across Asia. Speaking at the event about his role as the Sphere Country Focal Point, Kannaro shared, “My vision for the future is promoting awareness and the ability to apply Sphere among the network [CHF] members; secondly, to work with government line departments and ministries to integrate Sphere standards into disaster management law; and thirdly, to work together to apply and build awareness among community members so they know about the assistance they are receiving.”

[1] CHF is a network of national NGOs and civil society organizations working in Cambodia which aims to improve humanitarian actions for saving lives in communities during emergency through capacity building and training, accountability, coordination and cooperation, and quality humanitarian standard. http://www.chfcambodia.net/

As the Sphere regional partner in Asia, Community World Service Asia supports the promotion and implementation of the Sphere standards training, Q&A deployments, technical support, and events such as this forum. In collaboration with The Sphere Project, we organized the Sphere Focal Point Forum, twice, in 2011 and in 2014. This year’s Forum was jointly financed by The Sphere Project, Diakonie-Sweden, Act for Peace and Community World Service Asia.

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