Tags Posts tagged with "Youth"

Youth

To develop an environment that encourages the students’ physical and cognitive development, CWS-P/A established five play areas in schools that participate in its girls’ education project.

“I am very happy and enjoy coming to school,” shared Shakira, a fifth grade student. Ever since the play area was constructed, Shakira attends school regularly. Although her house is four kilometers from the school, she enjoys walking an hour before school so she can enjoy time in the play area. “I play three times a day; before school starts, during the break, and lastly before leaving for home. I feel quite energized and it also helps me to memorize my lesson very well. I am confident to attain first position in my class this year.”

Muzafar, a teacher, also observed a positive change in Shakira’s interests. “Before the construction of play areas, Shakira used to be absent very often, but now she has become very enthusiastic. She comes to school regularly and also learns her lesson well. She is ambitious to become a lawyer in the future.”

“I express my gratitude to the school management and CWS-P/A for motivating my daughter to attend school regularly”

During the construction process, our project team conducted several monitoring visits of the schools. Excited children were anxiously waiting for the play areas to be functional. They regularly asked our team when the play area would be completed and how frequently they will be allowed to play. Shakira’s parents have also acknowledged this effort and personally thanked our project staff for this initiative. “I express my gratitude to the school management and CWS-P/A for motivating my daughter to attend school regularly,” shared Samiullah, Shakira’s father. He further shared that the school principal informed him about the overall increase in children’s attendance and a growing interest in their studies.

Our girls’ education project began in 2009, with an aim to increase girls’ enrollment in school, enhance teachers’ capacity, and encourage community involvement in education, gender equality, and economic growth.

Many villages in Nangarhar are host to communities that cannot financially support their children’s education. Higher education is even more inaccessible due to distance, financial constraints, security concerns, and prevalent cultural restrictions.

Our girls’ education project is designed to provide the girls of these communities with a sustainable source of income, learning, and empowerment. Skills based classes on handicrafts such as hand embroidery, bead knitting, drawing, and painting were conducted as extra-curricular activities in the local girls’ schools selected in the Surkhroad District of the province as part of this project.

“My higher education is now ensured which will help me become a doctor so I can further support my family and the community.”

Diana, a student at the Peer Sayed Hassan Gailani High School in Surkhroad, and recipient of the skill based classes on embroidery handicraft has benefited immensely from these activities. One of her handicrafts was selected as the best piece by the panel of judges at the school competition. Diana started receiving numerous orders for making hand embroidered garments and other accessories from many schoolmates, teachers, and community members.

“I am really thankful to the Girls’ Education Project because it provided me the opportunity to introduce my skills to a wider audience. I, myself, did not realize my hand embroidery skills until I was appreciated by the judges’ panel and skill based class participants. That is when I recognized my skill and decided to further improve it and use it as an income source.”

Today, Diana has four female students from her neighborhood, to whom she teaches embroidery skills at her house, along with making products on order for other clients from the community. Diana plans to establish a handicrafts business center with other women from the community, in the future.

Diana further added, “I am very happy and hopeful for my future because my father has advised me to save my income generated through these sales for enrolling in university instead of contributing for household expenses. My higher education is now ensured which will help me become a doctor so I can further support my family and the community.”

Our girls’ education project began in 2009, with an aim to increase girls’ enrolment in school, enhance teachers’ capacity, and encourage community involvement in education, gender equality, and economic growth.

DurationJan 01, 2012Dec 01, 2014
LocationPakistan and Nepal
Key Activities
  • Development of curriculum and workbooks to enhance the knowledge, understanding, and skills of teachers and students relating to the Do No Harm approach and Local Capacities for Peace tools
  • Conducting training for teachers to enable them to engage students in activities that encourage cooperation, consensus building, and reflective listening
  • Organizing youth camps for students to explore these themes in-depth and train young people as peace ambassadors
  • Regional exposure visits for young people from Pakistan and Nepal to develop linkages and learn from each others’ experiences.
Participants60 teachers
135 Pakistani youth
5 Nepali youth

I had a conventional way of teaching previously. During the training, the trainers treated us as school kids which helped me build perception of understanding the student’s point of view. I was highly moved by the problem sharing exercise where the teacher has to listen to every student’s problems individually. I am now more aware of child psychology.

Ghazala Gill, a primary school teacher at DAWS Allied School Burewala.

I was a scared girl once at home, but teaching brought me to a challenging world and believing in myself. This workshop has given me another perspective to teach through interactive methods, keeping the students energized. I stayed with people of different religions and culture and developed a sense of living through no discrimination and interfaith harmony.

Fatima, a school teacher at ARM Child and Youth Welfare, Karachi

DurationOct 01, 2013Sep 01, 2016
LocationPunjab and Sindh provinces, Pakistan
Key Activities
  • Awareness-raising workshops educating participants about democracy and discrimination against religious minority communities
  • Training workshops to equip participants with advocacy skills
  • Development and performance of theater pieces by youth from religious minorities within their communities to promote awareness of their rights
  • Peer activities conducted by students to promote awareness among the student body of issues of discrimination
  • Building relationships between university students and youth from religious minorities to create strong links and networks across social divides
Participants200 university students
56 young people from religious minority communities

According to the statistics there is a lot of youth in Pakistan so they have the power to change the nation.

Adnan Nasir, student at University of Central Punjab

I have learned about the actual meaning of democracy and also learned what should be my behavior as a good citizen.

Nazish Jabeen, student at University of Agriculture

DurationJan 01, 2015Jan 31, 2016
LocationNangarhar and Laghman provinces
Key Activities
  • Subject-specific training for teachers on Biology, Chemistry, General Science and Mathematics;
  • Training for teachers on pedagogical techniques, creating an engaging learning environment through participatory methods and low and no cost materials;
  • Mobilizing the community to promote support for girls’ education;
  • Training for community and religious leaders on child rights and gender issues;
  • Development of active Parent-Teacher Committees to build links between schools and communities;
  • Provision of school materials to students
Participants100 teachers
120 parents/community members
480 Parent-Teacher Committee members
1,000 female students

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Heena, a Grade 3 teacher at the Abdurahman Pazhwak Girls High School, one of the participating schools under the Girls Education Project in Nangarhar,...

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According to the American Camp Association (ACA), youth development experts agree that children need a variety of experiences in their lives to help them...

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“My father drank alcohol daily and used to beat my mother,” quietly recounted a 15 years old daughter of Mohan from Haji Chanesar Mari...

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Ghulam Haider, an elderly leader of Khalwan Village, Surkhrood District, Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan, has been working with great dedication and enthusiasm advocating for girls’...

DurationApr 01, 2013Mar 31, 2016
LocationNangarhar and Laghman provinces
Key Activities
  • Political and civic education summer camps for girls
  • Student-centered teacher training for teachers
  • Community awareness sessions on the importance of girls’ education
  • Development of teacher resource centers
  • Establishment of playgrounds
Participants10,787 female students
1,089 teachers
620 parents
200 community members

Teaching is not just a job for me. It is my dream to help children learn, read, and write. Now, through the support of the project, parent-teacher committee, and community development council members, I am once again living my dream.

Zahida, a teacher in Laghman

If every organization focused on the quality of their trainings like this, for sure we would soon witness a quality education system with a capacitated team all over the country.

District Governor of Qarghai, as chief guest at the closing ceremony of a teachers’ training workshop

Using these methods and activities has resulted in decreasing the number of absentees.

Nasreen, a teacher in Nangarhar

More about Education

103
Heena, a Grade 3 teacher at the Abdurahman Pazhwak Girls High School, one of the participating schools under the Girls Education Project in Nangarhar,...

267
According to the American Camp Association (ACA), youth development experts agree that children need a variety of experiences in their lives to help them...

195
“My father drank alcohol daily and used to beat my mother,” quietly recounted a 15 years old daughter of Mohan from Haji Chanesar Mari...

398
Improving teachers’ skills and knowledge is seen as one of the most important investments, of time and resources, that local, state, and civil leaders...

392
Ghulam Haider, an elderly leader of Khalwan Village, Surkhrood District, Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan, has been working with great dedication and enthusiasm advocating for girls’...

DurationDec 01, 2011Nov 30, 2014
LocationQarghai, Alingar, Alishang, and Dawlat Shah districts of Laghman
Key Activities
  • Construction of delivery rooms
  • Enhancement of services in new and existing health facilities
  • Provision of health education
  • Provision of mother and child health services
Participants26,811 women of childbearing age, their spouses, and children

"Women are happy with the maternal health services that have started here. People are usually unable to afford proper health services and have to travel a long distance to reach them"

28 year old pregnant woman during a visit to Chapdarya sub-health center

"I was malnourished and had micronutrient deficiency, but now, I am healthy. I regularly come for antenatal check-ups and attended health education sessions and cooking demonstrations. My capacity has increased, and I am receiving proper care. I believe I will safely carry this baby to delivery."

Grana, a 30 year old woman from Nangarhar

"Our problems are solved and we are helped when we come to this health facility."

Bakhzarina, a mother from Nangarhar