Tags Posts tagged with "Gender"

Gender

DurationApr 01, 2015Mar 31, 2018
LocationDistrict Umerkot, Thatta, Sindh Province
Key Activities
  • Developing women’s skills in embroidery, dying, block printing and quilting through vocational training;
  • Formation of Women’s Enterprise Groups;
  • Training of women with basic literacy and numeracy skills as Sales and Marketing Agents;
  • Training of skilled women as Quality Assurance Supervisors;
  • Gender awareness activities to sensitize communities on gender discrimination and encourage support of women’s income-generation, control over resources and household decision-making;
  • Formation of Household Gender Action Groups
Participants700 women in vocational training
3,080 immediate and 7,560 extended household members benefitting from increased income
1,400 men and community members benefitting directly from gender sensitization activities
3,450 community members sensitized on gender issues through Gender Action Groups

IWD Banner (4)
International Women’s Day

The International Women’s Day 2015 #Make it Happen represents a celebration of the achievements of women in Pakistan towards a more inclusive and equitable society. Partnership for Resilience (P4R) Pakistan marked the Day with a lively debate to raise awareness and encourage dialogue with all sectors of society around effective action for women’s empowerment.

The debate titled “Make it happen – All overseas development funding should address gender equality and gender based violence to build resilient and safe communities in Pakistan”, brought together key players involved in disaster and development in Pakistan including the government and civil and private sectors. Ms. Annette Hearns, Deputy Head UNOCHA, Mr Qazi Azmat Isa, CEO Pakistan Pverty Alleviation Fund, Ms Abida Akram, National Forum for Women with Disabilities/STEP, Ms Khalida Salimi, OBE, Founder/Executive Director SACH, Ms Mossarrat Qadeem, Executive Director, Paiman Alumini Trust, Ms Asiya Nasir, Member National Assembly  were actively involved in making the event a success.  Ms Asiya Nasir was also the chief guest at the occasion.

Addressing the occasion, Chief Executive Officer, Pakistan Poverty Alleviation Fund (PPAF), Qazi Azmat Isa, focused on the empirical link between gender related outcomes and improved socio-economic indicators, emphasizing on Pakistan’s lack of progress on Human Development Index indicators as we feature amongst the lowest 10 countries on the continuum. He referred to both religious and traditional values that encourage rather than hinder such outcomes, particularly while working with rural communities. He referred to Pakistan’s position on achieving the Millennium Development Goals and commented on how working through deliberate, gender centered outcomes would greatly improve this.

The debate centered on the facts that in early recovery programmes, only 22 per cent of funds from cash contributions were directly disbursed to women in 2013 while more than 75 per cent of the 80 million people projected to be in need of humanitarian assistance in 2014 were women and children.

P4R support the many voices now being heard in Pakistan advocating for improvement in women and girls’ equality and one who stands out as  an example of who ‘made it happen’ is Malala Yousafzai, joint winner of the 2014 Nobel peace prize for her education campaign work.

P4R is an alliance of seven NGOs working together in Pakistan to improve the lives of vulnerable and marginalized segments of the population in times of disaster and post disaster. By working for and through local communities P4R builds the capacity of communities to be more resilient in time of disaster and enable them to recover quicker.

“2015 is a critical year for gender equality, as this year global leaders will conclude three key global processes that set the development agenda for the next 15 years: the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) following Millennium Development Goals, the post 2015 Hyogo Framework 2, and the Climate Change agenda. This is a unique opportunity for us to urge our Governments to ensure gender equality is not forgotten and call for a standalone goal on gender to be set in the SDGs, with clear targets and indicators for women’s empowerment and participation. This must, I feel, go further, with gender specific commitments cutting across all SDG goals and each of the 3 global processes. This is an opportune time for the Government of Pakistan to take up the banner for gender equality and champion it on the global stage”, said Neva Khan, Country Director of VSO and Chair of the P4R Steering Committee.

Each year, since 1911, International Women’s Day (IWD) is celebrated on March 8. Thousands of events occur to mark the economic, political and social achievements of women across the world. International Women’s day is also known for its #Paint it purple tag where the colour purple represents justice and dignity, two values upheld by P4R and used by all organizations in solidarity as we call for greater equality.

To develop an environment that encourages the students’ physical and cognitive development, CWS-P/A established five play areas in schools that participate in its girls’ education project.

“I am very happy and enjoy coming to school,” shared Shakira, a fifth grade student. Ever since the play area was constructed, Shakira attends school regularly. Although her house is four kilometers from the school, she enjoys walking an hour before school so she can enjoy time in the play area. “I play three times a day; before school starts, during the break, and lastly before leaving for home. I feel quite energized and it also helps me to memorize my lesson very well. I am confident to attain first position in my class this year.”

Muzafar, a teacher, also observed a positive change in Shakira’s interests. “Before the construction of play areas, Shakira used to be absent very often, but now she has become very enthusiastic. She comes to school regularly and also learns her lesson well. She is ambitious to become a lawyer in the future.”

“I express my gratitude to the school management and CWS-P/A for motivating my daughter to attend school regularly”

During the construction process, our project team conducted several monitoring visits of the schools. Excited children were anxiously waiting for the play areas to be functional. They regularly asked our team when the play area would be completed and how frequently they will be allowed to play. Shakira’s parents have also acknowledged this effort and personally thanked our project staff for this initiative. “I express my gratitude to the school management and CWS-P/A for motivating my daughter to attend school regularly,” shared Samiullah, Shakira’s father. He further shared that the school principal informed him about the overall increase in children’s attendance and a growing interest in their studies.

Our girls’ education project began in 2009, with an aim to increase girls’ enrollment in school, enhance teachers’ capacity, and encourage community involvement in education, gender equality, and economic growth.

Many villages in Nangarhar are host to communities that cannot financially support their children’s education. Higher education is even more inaccessible due to distance, financial constraints, security concerns, and prevalent cultural restrictions.

Our girls’ education project is designed to provide the girls of these communities with a sustainable source of income, learning, and empowerment. Skills based classes on handicrafts such as hand embroidery, bead knitting, drawing, and painting were conducted as extra-curricular activities in the local girls’ schools selected in the Surkhroad District of the province as part of this project.

“My higher education is now ensured which will help me become a doctor so I can further support my family and the community.”

Diana, a student at the Peer Sayed Hassan Gailani High School in Surkhroad, and recipient of the skill based classes on embroidery handicraft has benefited immensely from these activities. One of her handicrafts was selected as the best piece by the panel of judges at the school competition. Diana started receiving numerous orders for making hand embroidered garments and other accessories from many schoolmates, teachers, and community members.

“I am really thankful to the Girls’ Education Project because it provided me the opportunity to introduce my skills to a wider audience. I, myself, did not realize my hand embroidery skills until I was appreciated by the judges’ panel and skill based class participants. That is when I recognized my skill and decided to further improve it and use it as an income source.”

Today, Diana has four female students from her neighborhood, to whom she teaches embroidery skills at her house, along with making products on order for other clients from the community. Diana plans to establish a handicrafts business center with other women from the community, in the future.

Diana further added, “I am very happy and hopeful for my future because my father has advised me to save my income generated through these sales for enrolling in university instead of contributing for household expenses. My higher education is now ensured which will help me become a doctor so I can further support my family and the community.”

Our girls’ education project began in 2009, with an aim to increase girls’ enrolment in school, enhance teachers’ capacity, and encourage community involvement in education, gender equality, and economic growth.

The provision of health education and professionally staffed out-patient departments, fully equipped with Disease Early Warning System (DEWS) and Health Information System (HIS), significantly improved access and the quality of health care.
PhasePhase OnePhase Two
DurationJul 01, 2014Jun 30, 2015
LocationUC Korora and Shangla, District Shangla, KPK, Pakistan
Key Activities
  • Provision of services through 2 health centers in Karora, Allpuri and a delivery room in Besham.
  • Provision of general OPD out-patient department care services.
  • Provision of ante and postnatal checkups Referral of complicated cases to the next level of health facilities.
  • Provision of free essential medicines to patients attending our health facilities in Shangla.
  • Screening of malnourished, lactating, or pregnant women for nutritional status.
  • Screening of children who are malnourished.
  • Distribution of safe delivery kits and hygiene kits to pregnant and lactating women
  • De-worming of children
  • Establishing DEWS (Disease Early Warning System) and HIS (Health Information System) reporting.
  • Deliver basic trainings to traditional birth attendants in the catchments of our health facilities.
  • Delivery room of Besham hospital remains operational with staff and material resources.
  • Provision of Health Education through IEC (Information Education and Communication) materials
Participants38,000 Preventive and curative services
7,000: Reproductive health services
10,000: Broader assessment of nutritional health status among women and children
34,000: Health Awareness

Only two delivery cases were handled in this building during the past 15 years. [The health education campaign] really brought positive change into the community. Now, many women visit this health facility. It strongly reflects in the fact that in five months we handled 50 labor room cases.

Dr. Ayesha, a doctor with Community World Service Asia’s health program

Improved mother and child health care has significantly reduced the maternal and infant mortality rates.
PhasePhase OnePhase Two
DurationJul 01, 2013Jun 30, 2014
LocationShangla, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, Pakistan
Key Activities
  • Patient examination (by doctors, medical officers and lady health visitors)
  • Provision of essential drugs
  • Reproductive health services with a special focus on Mother and Child health care including antenatal and postnatal care
  • Distribution of safe delivery kits
  • Health Education sessions focusing on water borne diseases, STIs, HIV/AIDS, locally endemic diseases and distribution of information materials
  • Referral of patients to secondary and tertiary health care facilities
  • Management of alerts, threats and outbreaks, if any, in collaboration
  • DEWS reporting
  • Referral of disabled patients to facilities where assistance is available
Participants

Only two delivery cases were handled in this building during the past 15 years. [The health education campaign] really brought positive change into the community. Now, many women visit this health facility. It strongly reflects in the fact that in five months we handled 50 labor room cases.

Dr. Ayesha, a doctor with Community World Service Asia’s health program

DurationJul 01, 2013Jun 30, 2014
LocationMansehra, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province
Key Activities
  • Consultations by qualified doctors and lady health visitors (LHV)
  • Provision of essential drugs
  • Reproductive Health care services with a special focus on Mother and Child health including Ante-Natal and Post-Natal care
  • Health Education sessions focusing on water borne diseases, STIs, HIV/AIDs, locally relevant diseases and distribution of information materials
  • Referral of patients to Secondary and Tertiary healthcare facilities
  • Management of alerts, threats and outbreaks, if any, in collaboration with MOH/WHO
  • DEWS reporting
  • Expanded program on immunization against childhood preventable diseases
Participants60,000 Afghan refugees

When I was a child, I received vaccinations from CWS-P/A’s basic health unit and visited the BHU when I was sick. It was my dream to become a doctor and help my community. I really liked the vaccination and awareness programs, which is why I wanted to work and am still here eleven years later as a medical officer.

Dr. Wali Jan, a doctor with Community World Service Asia’s health program

DurationAug 01, 2012
LocationThatta District, Sindh Province, Pakistan
Key Activities
  • Formation of local health management committees to raise awareness of the health center and its services, and promote knowledge of key health issues;
  • Provision of check-ups for women and children, symptomatic diagnostics, pregnancy tests, ante- and post- natal care, family planning, provision of free medicines and nutritional supplements, and referral of cases;
  • Curative services to children under five, pregnant and lactating mothers
  • Community health sessions on family planning, ante- and post- natal care, hygiene and sanitation, nutrition, breastfeeding, and common and seasonal diseases
Participants20,504 community members (population of Union Council Bijora, District Thatta)

I am very happy with the support of CWS-P/A; they have saved my baby…They have properly guided me for nutrition and care of my pregnancy.

Noor Jahan, MNCH patient

If this center would not have existed, I couldn’t have accessed treatment from any hospital due to my poor economical situation. No doubt CWS-P/A has saved my life.

Muhammad Mallah, MNCH patient

PhasePhase OnePhase Three
DurationJan 01, 2015Dec 31, 2015
LocationThatta, Sindh Province, Pakistan
Key Activities
  • Adult literacy and vocational training
  • Product development and market linkages
  • Training workshops on disaster risk reduction skills, techniques and procedures
  • Community awareness-raising on key issues of sexual and reproductive health
  • Training and mobilization of community activists
Participants4,700 women from rural communities

After getting admission in the adult literacy center, I used to teach my daughters. My daughters were inspired when they saw me go to school with my bag. Now, they are motivated for education, and I have admitted them into the local school.

Saima, a project participant

After the 2010 floods, I have worked with different NGOs/INGOs. The way CWS-P/A works for sustainability is genius. We like working with them. Other organizations have given shelter, etc, but then they leave. These vocational skills will never die and will trickle down to our children.

Samoon, President of the Village Organization in Ghulam Mohammad Soorjo

We were very glad to see that our embroidery work can be sold in the market. I saw a hand bag for Rs. 300 (USD 3). I didn’t know these small handbags could be expensive. After the first visit, I came back and shared about the differences in cost here and in Karachi.

Bejum Jan, participant in the exposure visit to Karachi