AFGHANISTAN

Our Approach

We work with marginalized communities, returning refugees, host communities, religious and community leaders, teachers, youth, and other stakeholders to address basic needs including improving access to and the quality of health care, education, and livelihoods. By enhancing the capacity of existing community structures and individuals, Community World Service Asia supports communities in an effort to overcome inequality and to work toward sustainable food security, peace, access to basic rights, and resilience. We strive to build the capacity of teachers to help develop the quality of education and its role in the country’s development as well as support NGOs with organizational development through training and technical support. We also actively engage government departments and communities in DRR activities. When necessary, emergency response is provided to disaster-affected communities.

Strong. Irrepressible. Free. From Helmand to Kabul.
0
children
overcame conflict
0
% fewer
tuberculosis deaths
0
hour
delivery services
0
teachers'
methods improved
0
girls
enrolled in school
0
% yield
increase for farmers

Afghanistan

Afghanistan by the numbers

  • Poverty

    Afghanistan is the second poorest country in Asia, with 58.8% of the population living in multidimensional poverty (UNDP, 2014)

  • Labor Force

    Labor force participation is low at less than 50%, meaning that too many Afghans are without the means to lift themselves out of poverty (National Risk and Vulnerability Assessment, 2012)

  • Infant Mortality

    The highest infant mortality rate and one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world (Afghanistan Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey, 2010)

  • Education post-Taliban

    Primary school attendance increased to 66% of boys and 40% of girls (Central Statistics Organization (Afghanistan) and UNICEF, 2012)

    31% of adults are literate while 47% of young people can read and write (National Risk and Vulnerability Assessment, 2012)

    Only 40% of boys and 20% of girls complete six years of basic education (Central Statistics Organization (Afghanistan) and UNICEF, 2012)


Afghanistan Offices